Asylums Bend Genre Stereotypes with Alien Human Emotions

Asylums Bend Genre Stereotypes with Alien Human Emotions
4/5
For a band that have, though their previous record, thrived under the pretence of merging comic books and rock n roll whilst resembling extras of the IT Crowd, Asylums are back with an exquisite album name leading their millennial renovation with their new album, Alien Human Emotions out July 6th.
Asylums seemed the sort of project that started out as an effervescent ball of youthful energy with the outcome being a tremendous debut album, however it has morphed into something altogether more intense and honestly, a lot groovier. Releasing the album on their own record label, Cool Thing Records the Essex four-piece are using the challenge of the “difficult second album” as a ramp to a higher place and are sitting there as a new, fresher alt-rock group. The band have changed fundamentally in the last two years, certainly older and potentially wiser showing an avalanche of maturity in this second album but with still a slight resistance to grow up. Whilst not losing touch with their unlikely rock star presence, Asylums prove that they are a band deserving to be heard.
The follow up that the four-piece have concocted is a genre-bending prototype focusing on topics such as the UK housing crisis and the control of drinking. The title track shows integrity and a hunger for a grittier career path for Asylums whilst riskier examples such as ‘Napalm Bubblegum’ are fusions of fast-paced balls of excitement that give slight nods to their debut, KillerBrain Waves proving that the boys are not losing touch with the unique sound found in their earlier days. However, all songs fuse together adding to the dark danceability of the album.
The enticing and perfectly crafted suit that Asylums have formed shows no sign of pretentiousness whilst the album acts as a perfect model for them as they bring genre stereotypes down. Kicking their way into 2018 whilst projecting moments of dark audio experimentalism and wearing a social conscience loud and proud seems yet another path Asylums have mastered.

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